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Intervention

Intervention

Reporting and recording

DfE Advice to Schools

All pupils understand the school’s approach and are clear about the part they can play to prevent bullying, including when they find themselves as bystanders.
Successful schools make it easy for pupils to report bullying so that they are assured that they will be listened to and incidents acted on. Pupils should feel that they can report bullying which may have occurred outside school including cyber-bullying.

 

Preventing & Tackling Bullying - Advice for headteachers, staff and governing bodies. 

Intervention

Reporting and recording

Brighton and Hove City Council

Brighton & Hove City Council recommends that all schools record both bullying and prejudiced based incidents by type and provides guidance for how to do this in the Bullying and prejudice based incident recording and reporting guidance for Brighton and Hove schools Sept 2014.
  

The Council asks all schools to return their bullying by type data on a termly basis. The Council provides advice on how to use SIMS to record bullying and prejudiced based incidents. Schools are using a range of ways to record including SIMS and CPOMS. The Council recommends checking that all the categories are listed on CPOMS or other system as described in the guidance. 

Intervention

Reporting and recording.

BHASVIC

‘Confidence in disclosing concerns is critical’. Therefore we have established a wide range of ways a student can contact the counselling service (e-mail service included) and there are a range of other support that students can access including welfare, personal tutors, teachers, the Student Union and Student Council as well as peer supporters. We also have a is a key ‘Bring a Friend’ ethos so that students can access support with a friend there.

 

Intervention

Reporting and recording

Blatchington Mill

The Equality Commissioners at Blatchington Mill help prepare assemblies where the Safe and Well at School Survey (SAWSS) is shared with all year groups. The assemblies highlight which groups might feel less safe at school, why this might be and what other people can do with an emphasis on reporting.
PSHE in KS3 reinforces the fact that Blatchington Mill is a ‘telling’ school. There are clear expectations about what will happen when bullying is reported, students are taught how to talk to their parents and carers about being bullied and what the school systems and sanctions are. Students are encouraged to tell the Assistant Year Team Leaders – either personally or with a friend. These members of staff a highly valued by students and staff are a great asset in managing bullying consistently in the school. . Only higher level incidents are referred up to the deputy head and he will model the approaches they use with new staff. This results in fewer serious incidents because students know that even the small things will be dealt with quickly, respectfully and consistently.

 

Intervention

Reporting and recording

Downs Park

Bullying and prejudiced based incidents forms are completed by any member of staff who witnesses an incident. Copies are sent to the class teacher and head of department and recorded. These forms include who bullied who about what so that repeat offences can be quickly identified. All recording goes on to CPOMS which aids clear reporting but also enables transfer of information to new schools as needed.
Downs Park also have incident forms and serious incident forms which cover the context, the incident, the actions taken (including RJ) these are collated and in serious incidents shared with head and parents.

 

Intervention

Reporting and recording

Somerhill Junior

Somerhill encourages reporting of bullying in a range of ways. There are Worry boxes in each classroom. The teacher responds and passes concerns to the Learning Mentor or the head of safeguarding if necessary.
There are notices around the school telling children who to talk to if they have a problem. Children are encouraged to speak to learning mentors on the playground at break times and the learning mentors’ room is always open for children to ‘drop in’.

 

Intervention

Reporting and recording

West Blatchington Primary

West Blatchington Primary encourages reporting in a range of ways. All classes have Bubble Time which allows children to request 1:1 time with a member of staff. Each class also has a ‘worry box’ and there is a ‘Voice Box’ which is used for student feedback about a number of issues. This is only opened by a trusted learning mentor and now it is not just being used for ‘worries’ it is being used more by children who have worries. Playground staff use a grey  reporting slip process to inform the learning mentor of all incidents. Positive behaviours are also recorded on a slip. These are recorded on CPOMS. This system is used by all and is proving very effective in helping staff to spot trends and to be able to analyse what is happening.

 

Intervention

Reporting and recording

Longhill Secondary

In order to address LGBTU bullying the school identified members of staff who were willing to put themselves forward as ‘Allies’ who could be approached if any child or young person felt they were being homophobically, biphobically or transphobically bullied or who wanted to talk about their sexual orientation. Pictures of the staff are shown on posters around the school. Allsorts Youth Project provided support to this project.

 

Intervention

Restorative Justice Approaches

Downs Park

Downs Park Special School has adapted the Restorative Approach to their context by simplifying the language for younger or children with no language, using signing, feelings pictures and feelings fans from Working with Others. Support staff wear lanyards with feeling pictures on. The neutrality of the restorative justice approach works well for children with heighted anxiety. Additional language that reflects positive, responsible behaviour through the restorative justice process also helps. Having restorative justice as part of the culture allows staff to feel secure enough to let go of the control and enable problem solving to happen and relationships to build. Children and young people want to access restorative justice because they want to put things right and they want to feel better themselves. Adaptations are made according to need and might include role play of what happened for those with little language or role play of how it might be different next time providing a physical rehearsal of doing it ‘right’. Peer support and intervention in the form of Bully Busters in each department being trained to support other pupils in reporting worries/ incidents. Attachment aware approach means that some pupils are supported to use RJ by their key-adult and secure base team. This ensures there are no feelings of shame. Previous trauma/ vulnerabilities are taken in to account when discussing and finding resolutions. Work around 'targeting individuals' is on-going and relationship based i..e projects/ activities with the pupils involved may be built up over a period of weeks.

 

Case Study

 

Intervention

Restorative Justice Approaches

Hove Park Short Stay School

The Short Stay School Vision is simple. As a team the focus is on creating strong rapport with young people in an environment where the core value is respect; you give respect, you get respect. Staff believe that happy, healthy young people are more likely to show positive and respectful behaviour. At Short Stay School the aim is to help the young person want to help themselves and make the relevant changes in order to succeed. Staff do this through a holistic approach with health, fitness and wellbeing being an integral part of the programme coupled with taught core lessons and a diverse range of practical and engaging activities. The aims of the Short Stay School are summarised in its brochure.


The Short Stay School has strong links with outside agencies and services such as Sussex Police, Brighton and Hove Youth Services and Brighton Youth Offending Service. Frequent visits from these professionals, as well as teachers and support staff, aim to break down barriers and create more positive working relationships.


The Restorative Justice principles are embedded in to daily practice and rhetoric with young people, instilling the need to take ownership of their actions and responsibility for the consequences. Strategies used – help young people unpick events, see other people’s points of view, consider ways to prevent or avoid it happening again and provide uplift through empowerment. This helps young people to consider and rehearse ways in which they could change their behaviour, providing plenty of opportunities to build self esteem. Young people are encouraged to ‘be strong in who you are’ by noticing and appreciating small achievements, providing and rehearsing different language and working from where the student is – building on their assets. There is an anti-bullying policy in place.


A Year 9 Hove Park School students describes the school:
‘For me, Short Stay School is a place out of school where I can relax and be myself; where I can take time out of my life to reflect on my behaviour and my attitude towards learning so that when I go back to school I have a clear mind and am ready to work and be more focused and try and make changes to my behaviour’.
“it’s not about winning or losing, it’s about taking part, or not taking part. It’s about choice.”
These are the principles I live by. When you stay at SSS you learn about making choices; the right ones or the wrong ones. I am learning to take full responsibility for my actions.
“With great power comes great responsibility”
We’re not weird , we’re limited edition.

 

Case Study

 

Intervention

Restorative Justice Approaches

Goldstone Primary

The school has a Sunflower Room run by 2 non teaching staff which offers prevention provision. One staff member is trained in Restorative Justice (RJ). Sociograms are used twice a year to identify vulnerable children who are then targeted by Sunflower Room staff. Teachers can also refer children and children can self refer at any time. The room provides a safe space and a number of different interventions including social skills. It is well used and appreciated by staff, pupils and parents who can drop in any morning A parent groups also run from this provision using SEAL materials.

 

Intervention

Restorative Justice Approaches

West Blatchington

The school uses the restorative justice (RJ) approach. Some of the most significant changes have been to do with the language used such as replacing Anti-Bullying week with Relating Week. This emphasis on language has in turn led to a change in the way adults speak to and behave towards children. The RJ approach has changed how children feel about being honest. There may still be a sanction but that could be removal from the playground followed by a period of reflection and finding a way of putting things right – either directly to the harmed person or indirectly to the wider school community. Children now think in terms of repairing harm. When there is an incident staff can get the children involved in it to talk about it – everything is ‘kinder’ and there is a focus on reintegration. However, the school recognises that it needs to be an external regulator for some children so staff teach ways to validate feelings and find alternative solutions. There are plans afoot for a large sign in the playground which will have a spinning wheel of options for restorative solutions and a red/green indicator to show whether children need adult support or not to resolve problems. The school is also developing visual reminders of possible solutions – take turns, ask an adult, have some time out etc.

 

Intervention

Cyberbullying

Downs Park

The school understands that although there is little bullying behaviour in terms of systematic, repeated intentional harm to an individual the nature of the children means that there is at times conflict and aggressive behaviour arising from the frustrations and anxieties of some young people. There was a potential cyber bullying incident where children within a class were falling out whilst online gaming at home at night. The school told parents and carers and asked that they ban the children from connecting up for a period of time. This demonstrated an understanding of the need for flexibility and creativity. Something will work for a while and then it won’t or it will work today but not tomorrow. The school is always considering options like tools in the toolbox taking into consideration the students’ needs, the context and the severity of every situation.

 

Intervention

Cyberbullying

West Blatchington

When there was an incident of cyberbullying between a group of girls the response was pro-active engagement of the children in positive bonding experiences such as painting nails, making friendship bracelets etc. This was followed by an assembly using a range of children wearing masks to read out a text message exchange that was hurtful etc The children attending assembly were then asked to suggest ways that this could have been done differently and put these in the ‘Voice Box.’ A second assembly represented the situation with positive options including tell someone, show the texts to someone, respond differently etc.

 

Intervention

Cyberbullying

Blatchington Mill

When the school had to deal with a serious sexist cyber bullying incident involving a large number of students they chose to use the Shared Concern approach.

Case Study

 

Intervention

Cyberbullying

BHASVIC

When the College had to deal with a sexting incident they looked for external support.

 

 

Case Study

 

Intervention

Friendship Groups - Girls

Hangleton Primary

Hangleton Primary School worked with an independent consultant to pilot a small group work programme for a group of girls who were having ongoing and problematic issues within their friendship group. Having worked with the independent consultant the school now feels confident to adapt and repeat the programme in the future. A report was written on this pilot group. The small group work materials can be found on Pier2Peer.

 

Intervention

SEND Bullying

Homewood College

Homewood College uses the 'no blame approach' when appropriate.

 

Case study

 

Intervention

SEND Bullying

Brighton and Hove City Council, Achievement for All, Anti-Bullying Alliance

The Council has been working in partnership with schools, Achievement for All and the Anti-Bullying Alliance to prevent bullying of pupils and students with special educational needs and disabilities through the use of nationally provided training and resources. Many resources are available on the Anti-Bullying Alliance website.

In addition the council in partnership with Hillside Special School is developing approaches to Disability Equality. For more information please email pshe@brighton-hove.gov.uk 
 

Intervention

Parent / carer involvement

Brighton and Hove City Council

The Council in partnership with the Equality & Anti-Bullying Schools Strategy Group produced a Bullying Leaflet for parents and carers on supporting your child if they have been bullying which has been used in schools in a variety of ways. Dorothy Stringer school issued the leaflet to all new year 7 parents when they attended a welcome event in October and provide a link to the leaflet from their school website. Carlton Hill keep copies of the leaflet in their reception area and have copies available at parents’ evenings.

The Council in partnership with the Equality & Anti-Bullying Schools Strategy Group has also developed a top tips guide for school staff on talking with parents and carers about bullying these have been displayed in many schools and feedback is that schools find these helpful.

Brighton & Hove City Council with partners has developed this for parents and carers and recommends all settings signpost to it from their school websites.

 

Intervention

Parent/carer involvement - e-safety

Brighton and Hove City Council

Paul Platts can provide support to schools in delivering e-safety sessions for parents and carers. For further information email Paul.Platts@brighton-hove.gov.uk
 

Intervention

Parent/carer involvement

Varndean and Dorothy Stringer Schools

Varndean and Stringer run termly ‘Talking to your teens…’ sessions for parents and carers across both schools. This programme has included a workshop on bullying and e-safety which looked at definitions of bullying, shared ideas of how to respond as a parent or carer to different scenarios and ideas for how to support their children to stay safe online. As part of a new pilot the schools have also been working with parents to ‘contract together’ around key messages to their children. Two tutor groups of year 7 parents and carers at Varndean School agreed that they would tell their children that there would be no ‘screens’ in their bedrooms after 9pm. Parents and carers report positively on the principle that it is not just them telling their child they couldn’t do something and that this has had a positive impact on reading.

 

Intervention

Student involvement

Downs Park

The school has Bully Busters who are nominated and voted in. They have a badge and training involving what is bullying? What might you see if bullying is happening? How can we stop it happening? What can you do? The emphasis is on helping children to report – they can find a bully buster who will help them to fill in a form and then seek adult help. The school is explicit with the rest of the children about the qualities the bully busters have – ie good listeners etc. Ofsted reported in 2014 Discussions with pupils indicate that they are very clear as to what constitutes bullying. They say that such incidents are very rare and this was confirmed when the school’s records were examined. Pupils were very confident that staff would help them and were very pleased with the pupil ‘Bully Busters’ and how they could help them if necessary.

 

Intervention

Student involvement

Somerhill Junior (now Brunswick Primary)

The school has a total of 42 Playground Buddies made up of volunteers from each class. They are given 8-10 weeks training given by a learning mentor which is modified for younger children. The children wear jackets and work on playground. They meet as a team and also meet other schools in a forum facilitated by Safety Net. They produce a termly newsletter and there is evidence that this system benefits the buddies as much as the rest of the school. Children in the focus group reported buddies as a good thing.

 

Intervention

Student involvement

Homewood College

The college is working towards the BIG award for anti-bullying. They have a logo designed by a student – Stop Every Bully. They also have half termly meetings with the school counsellor and from this students have suggested a bully buddy system where Ks 4 look out for Ks3. They have named themselves as Homewood Helping Heroes. The students that have been encouraged to get involved are emotionally mature enough, not bullies, respected by their peers and have leadership qualities. The students also designed the Stop Every Bully Award which is given weekly to a student who has been spotted doing something positively to reduce bullying. This empowered the students to proactively get involved and provided a positive framework for addressing bullying which resulted in more open conversations and a reduction in incidents. Homewood has also created a PROMISE TREE on a visible hall wall where pupils and teaching staff make promises to combat bullying. Also, they have a survey for pupils and parents to fill out once a year (done two years in a row now) to monitor feelings within the school and with parents on how the school is dealing with bullying.

 

Bullying Intervention Group

 

Intervention

External support

Safety Net

Safety Net are able to provide 1:1 and group work support for children and young people involved in bullying behaviour.
 
 

 

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