Brookfield Community School

A Specialist Sport College


Brookfield Community School > Curriculum > Mathematics > KS4 Maths > Year 10

Hello year 10 and welcome to your maths pages.

 

 


 

Year 10 Data Coursework F

 

F

 

 

Year 10 Data Coursework Helpsheet

 

 

Use this checklist to see what you should do to get the best marks possible.

 

 

To get ~3 marks out of 8:

Compare the data in a single set of results, using some basic charts and calculations, to reach a simple conclusion.

 

To get ~5 marks out of 8:

Compare two different sets of data with a clear intention.  Show awareness of which charts and calculations represent the data best.  Show that you know about how to sample and gather data.

 

 

 

 

See the next page for a more detailed list.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT TO DO

(The further down this list you get, the better your marks will be)

 

  1. Decide how to group the original data -how many groups? -how wide will each group be?
  1. Sort the data into your groups, with frequencies for each group.
  1. Summarise your table by a bar chart, pie chart, frequency polygon, or cumulative frequency curve.  You can use more than one sort of chart if appropriate.  Make sure your graphs are accurately drawn on graph paper, with the correct labelling and titles.
  1. Make any calculations that might help -e.g. mean average, modal group, median, range.
  1. From your chart(s) and calculations, make some observations.  Is the data spread out? Squashed up?  i.e. wildly varying, or quite consistent?  Is it what you would have expected?  Does anything stand out -unusual data values, strong peaks or flat plateaux in the charts?  Do the calculations you have made represent the data well, in your opinion? 

REMEMBER THAT THE GRAPHS AND CALCULATIONS DON'T GET YOU MARKS BY THEMSELVES - YOU HAVE TO WRITE ABOUT WHAT THEY TELL YOU, TO GET MARKS FROM THEM.

 

  1. Now move on.  Look at the data gathered for you in school. (How would you have gathered the data, if you could have chosen?)  You must use some of this data for the next stage.  What are you going to analyse?  The difference between age groups?  The difference between genders?  The difference between estimating one thing, and another?
  1. Now you know what you are going to compare, suggest what results you are expecting from it.  (e.g. Do you think older students will do better than younger ones?  Might girls turn out to be better than boys?  …)
  1. Once you have your data for comparing, group it, graph it, make appropriate calculations and come to some conclusions.

 

Year 10 Data Coursework

 

 

H

 

Year 10 Data Coursework Helpsheet

 

 

Use this checklist to see what you should do to get the best marks possible.

 

 

To get ~3 marks out of 8:

Compare the data in a single set of results, using some basic charts and calculations, to reach a simple conclusion.

 

To get ~5 marks out of 8:

Compare two different sets of data with a clear intention.  Show awareness of which charts and calculations represent the data best.  Show that you know about how to sample and gather data.

 

To get ~7 marks out of 8:

The above and...Have a clear strategy of how to compare different sets of data, with some predictions of what you might find.  Comment on how successful your plan and the techniques you used were.  Suggest improvements to your work, and draw careful conclusions.

 

 

 

See next pages for a more detailed list.

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT TO DO

(The further down this list you get, the better your marks will be)

 

  1. Decide how to group the original data -how many groups? -how wide will each group be?
  1. Sort the data into your groups, with frequencies for each group.
  1. Summarise your table by a bar chart, pie chart, frequency polygon, or cumulative frequency curve.  You can use more than one sort of chart if appropriate.  Make sure your graphs are accurately drawn on graph paper, with the correct labelling and titles.
  1. Make any calculations that might help -e.g. mean average, modal group, median, range.
  1. From your chart(s) and calculations, make some observations.  Is the data spread out? Squashed up?  i.e. wildly varying, or quite consistent?  Is it what you would have expected?  Does anything stand out -unusual data values, strong peaks or flat plateaux in the charts?  Do the calculations you have made represent the data well, in your opinion? 

REMEMBER THAT THE GRAPHS AND CALCULATIONS DON'T GET YOU MARKS BY THEMSELVES - YOU HAVE TO WRITE ABOUT WHAT THEY TELL YOU, TO GET MARKS FROM THEM.

 

  1. Now move on.  Look at the data gathered for you in school. (How would you have gathered the data, if you could have chosen?)  You must use some of this data for the next stage.  What are you going to analyse?  The difference between age groups?  The difference between genders?  The difference between estimating one thing, and another?
  1. Once you know what you are going to look at, you can use the techniques above again, and/or draw a correlation graph if appropriate.  But first…
  1. Decide on how much data to use.  YOU MUST USE AT LEAST 30 PIECES OF DATA FROM EACH PART OF THE POPULATION YOU ARE WORKING ON.  30, 50 or 60 would be good numbers: but how do you choose them?  Answer: sample randomly.  Your teacher can show you how to do this, if you ask them.  (There are other methods of sampling, and if you are in a higher maths group, you should check out what these are; you need to be able to show why you have chosen random sampling to be the best.)

 

 

  1. Now you know what you are going to compare, suggest what results you are expecting from it.  (e.g. Do you think older students will do better than younger ones?  Might girls turn out to be better than boys?  …)
  1. Once you have your data for comparing, group it, graph it, make appropriate calculations and come to some conclusions.
  1. Was it as you expected?
  1. Do you think the data was collected well?  Could you have done it better? -How?
  1. Is there some other aspect of the whole situation to which you would like to find answers? -How would you go about collecting data to analyse this, if you had to?
  1. Looking back, what aspects or techniques in your project would you have changed?  How would this have changed your coursework for the better?  Do you think the changes would make a big difference to your results and conclusions?
  1. What are your overall conclusions for this whole piece of work?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rectangles data
Mice help sheet
Login
Forgotten password?
Having trouble logging in?