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Curriculum Ideas & School Examples

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KS1: Geography

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Geographical enquiry and skills (National Curriculum KS1)
 

(1) In undertaking geographical enquiry, pupils should be taught to:

(a) Ask geographical questions
[for example, 'What is it like to live in this place?']
*Children can participate in the 'Ask Us A Question' forums, asking other children around the UK and Internationally about their life and locality.
(b) Observe and Record
[for example, identify buildings in the street and complete a chart]
*Children create a representation of their own life and locality through the Global Village/Schools area within projects or their own cLc which they can then share with other learners locally or further afield.
(c) Express their own views about people, places and environments
[for example, about litter in the school]
*Children take on the responsibility of keeping a Diary recording their experiences in their local area, expressing views about the people, places and local environment.
*Children can be engaged in discussing potential improvements to their local area
(d) Communicate in different ways
[for example, in pictures, speech, writing]
*Children are encouraged to use practical skills such as writing, drawing, role-playing as well as online/ICT skills such as sound recording, typing, digital photography, podcasting, filming and using Web 2.0 tools (wikis & blogs) throughout their representations of their local area, built within the cLc.
 
(2) In developing geographical skills, pupils should be taught to:
(a) Use geographical vocabulary
[for example, hill, river, motorway, near, far, north, south]
*Children can be prompted to use the appropriate vocabulary through the scaffolded representation of their life and locality.
(b) Use fieldwork skills
[for example, recordinginformation on a school plan or local area map]
*Children can be prompted to use Google Map which can be embedded into the cLc to investigate other participating schools and to find out more about their own locality.
(c) Use globes, maps and plans at a range of scales
[for example, following a route on a map]
*Children can use both online and offline mapping tools to investigate features of their locality.
(d) Use secondary sources of informaion
[for example, pictures, photos, stories, information, text, film, artefacts]
*Children can learn about localities other than their own through the representations made by other participating children/schools.
(e) Make maps and plans
[for example, a pictorial map of a place in a story]
*Children can make a variety of digital and practical resources to support their representation of their locality.
 
(3) In Knowledge and understanding of places Pupils should be taught to:
(a) Identify and describe what places are like
[for example, in terms of landscape, jobs, weather]
*Children can be are encouraged through the scaffolded representations of their school and locality  to use specific descriptive vocabulary. 
(b) Identify and describe where places are
[for example, position on a map, whether they are on a river]
*Children are encouraged to use specific descriptive vocabulary which identifies positioning when using Google Maps embedded within the cLc.
(c) Recognise how places have become the way they are and how they are changing [for example, the quality of the environment in a street]
*Children can identify the differences between their locality and recordings of their locality found through local primary sources in order to identify changes in the past, and also consider changes that may happen in the future.
(d) Recognise how places compare with other places [for example, compare the local area with places elsewhere in the United Kingdom]
*Children can identify the differences between their locality and other localities they then can compare and contrast these localities.
(e) Recognise how places are linked to other places in the world [for example, food from other countries].
This provides a basis for pupils' understanding of global citizenship in later key stages.
*Children can be prompted to consider and discuss connections between localities being discussed by partnerships formed.
 
 
(4) In Knowledge and understanding of patterns and processes pupils should be taught to:
(a) make observations about where things are located
[for example, a pedestrian crossing near school gates]
and other features in the environment [for example, seasonal changes in weather]
 *Children can create a representation of their own life and locality and record places of local significance for example.
(b) Recognise changes in physical and human features
[for example, heavy rain flooding fields]
*Children can identify the differences between their locality and recordings of their locality found through local primary sources in order to identify changes in the past, and also consider changes that may happen in the future.
  
(5) In Knowledge and understanding of environmental change and sustainable development pupils should be taught to:
(a) Recognise changes in the environment [for example, traffic pollution in a street]
*Children can identify the differences between their locality and recordings of their locality found through local primary sources in order to identify changes in the past, and also consider changes that may happen in the future.
(b) Recognise how the environment may be improved and sustained [for example, by restricting the number of cars].
*Children can discuss changes that they believe should take place to their localityin the future, specifically focusing on their immediate school area, and potential improvements that could be made through their School Council.  
  
(6) Pupils should be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through the study of two localities:
(a) The locality of the school (its immediate vicinity, including school buildings and grounds and the surrounding area within easy access).
*Children can identify key features within their locality.They then compare and contrast these localities.
 
(b) A locality either in the United Kingdom or overseas that has physical and/or human features that contrast with those in the locality of the school. *Children identify key features within their locality. They then compare and contrast these localities which include the UK and beyond.
 
(7) In their study of localities, pupils should:
(a) Study at a local scale ('Scale' refers to the geographical extent of a study. A local-scale study is a study of a small area (for example, a neighbourhood, village or small town)
(b) carry out fieldwork investigations outside the classroom.
 

 
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